2017

The San Jacinto Trail Report for 2017 is archived here in blog style, i.e. with most recent report at top.

 

17 May 2017

Overview: Almost all sections of all trails are largely clear of snow (but see details below). Traction aids (e.g., microspikes) are no longer required on any established trails. Due to warm overnight and daytime temperatures forecast for the remainder of May, rapid melting of snow patches will continue.

Water: Continues to be widespread >7500’, ephemeral streams at lower elevations are mostly dry. The faucet at Round Valley is flowing well (it had been dry for three years).

Pacific Crest Trail: The PCT is almost completely clear of snow throughout the San Jacinto Mountains. There are some very small, easily traversed, snow patches either side of Annie’s Junction (the State Park boundary north of Saddle Junction, where the PCT turns sharply west to Strawberry Cienega), and then again along the 0.5 mile section just south of the Fuller Ridge Trail junction.

Fuller Ridge Trail is almost completely clear. Where there are occasional small remnants of snow drifts there are obvious tracks to follow with well-dug steps. Small snow patches are most extensive between 3.1-3.7 miles along Fuller Ridge (measured from the south end of the trail), but the trail is easy to follow and the snow is melting very quickly. Note that there is excellent flowing water at 0.48 and 0.68 miles north from the S end of Fuller Ridge Trail.

San Jacinto Peak trails: The trail north from Saddle Junction to San Jacinto Peak is almost completely clear of snow, other than occasional small remnant drifts. The only extended area of snow ptches is north of Wellman’s Divide, between 9900’-10100’, but the trail is obvious and snow patches rarely extend for more than a few yards.

The Deer Springs Trail above the Fuller Ridge Trail is largely clear to San Jacinto Peak, but where there is patchy snow it is easily traversed and with good tracks to follow.  In Little Round Valley there continues to be about 50% snow cover under the trees, but the trail is obvious.

At San Jacinto Peak itself, there remains only 10% snow cover above 10,500’, and the peak trail only crosses a handful of small snow patches.

Skyline Trail: Completely clear.

Long Valley and Round Valley Loop trails: Almost completely clear, a few tiny snow patches.

Round Valley to Wellman Divide: Largely clear, a few small snow patches remaining especially just below Wellman Divide, but these are easily crossed and the trail is easy to follow.

Deer Springs Trail: clear to Strawberry Junction (see above for details beyond Fuller Ridge).

PCT south from Saddle Junction to closure: Largely clear, small snow patches near Chinquapin Flat.

South Ridge Trail: Clear from South Ridge Road trailhead to Tahquitz Peak, then passable with care to PCT (Chinquapin Flat). There remains one very small but steep patch of snow to cross between Tahquitz Peak and Chinquapin Flat that requires some care to traverse, but there are well dug steps.

Devils Slide Trail: Clear.

Marion Mountain Trail:  Clear.

 

8 May 2017

Overview: Light snow on 7th May resulted in new snow accumulations of 2” at 6500’ (Humber Park), 4.5” at 8000’ (Saddle Junction), and 6-7” at 9000’ (various locations) on the western side of the mountain. Somewhat less snowfall occurred >9000’ and on the eastern slopes. Snow condition was soft and powdery, making it easy to walk on without traction aids. Drifting in places (e.g. Tahquitz ridge, Annie’s Junction area) is considerable, with snow abruptly changing from a few inches deep to 1-2’ deep, then back again.

Very rapid melting is anticipated in the next 2-4 days, and most trails below 9000’ may be largely clear again by next weekend (or mid May at the latest). Traction aids (e.g., microspikes) are not essential on any of the established trails, although those who are unfamiliar hiking on snow may find them useful in some areas.

Pacific Crest Trail: The PCT from Chinquapin Flat through Fuller Ridge has an estimated snow covering of 2-7” depending on elevation (see above), with depths also varying due to drifting and aspect. However the entire PCT in the San Jacinto Mountains is being heavily traveled on 8 May, helping to make the trail very obvious and easily followed. Microspikes are unlikely to be needed by most hikers.

PCT south from Saddle Junction to closure: 4-6” snow, but the trail is obvious with excellent tracks to follow.

South Ridge Trail: Clear from South Ridge Road to Old Lookout Flat (7800’). Only 1-3” snow on the trail to Tahquitz Peak. Passable with care from Tahquitz Peak to PCT (Chinquapin Flat). There are good tracks to follow through this section despite some moderate drifting. Those who are uncomfortable hiking on snow may find microspikes and hiking poles useful for the short section from Tahquitz Peak to the PCT.

Devils Slide Trail: Largely clear, 2-4” snow on the trail near Saddle Junction.

 

5 May 2017

Overview: Extremely rapid melting has continued. Due to mild overnight temperatures, snow is now relatively soft in the morning making hiking easier all day. Traction aids (e.g., microspikes) are no longer essential on any of the established trails, although those who are unfamiliar hiking on snow will find them useful in some areas (as described below).

WEATHER PROGNOSIS: Possible light snow is forecast for 6-9 May for elevations >6000’. This may complicate trail navigation in some areas. More importantly, freezing temperatures in this period may make existing snow harder to traverse, and microspikes will probably be useful in those areas with existing extensive snow (as described below).

Water: Continues to be widespread >7500’, ephemeral streams at lower elevations are mostly dry.

Pacific Crest Trail: The PCT is almost completely clear of snow throughout the San Jacinto Mountains. There are some small, easily traversed, snow patches for about half-a-mile from 1.5 miles north of Saddle Junction until Annie’s Junction (the State Park boundary), and then again from just south of the Marion Mountain Trail junction to the Fuller Ridge Trail junction.

Fuller Ridge Trail is now largely clear and microspikes are not be needed by most hikers. Where there are occasional snow drifts there are obvious tracks to follow with well-dug steps. The snow patches are most extensive between 3.1-3.7 miles along Fuller Ridge (measured from the south end of the trail), but the trail is easy to follow and the snow is excellent for walking on. Note that there is excellent flowing water at 0.48 and 0.68 miles north from the S end of Fuller Ridge Trail.

San Jacinto Peak trails: On the trail north from Saddle Junction, there is patchy snow from the crest at 9000’ thru Annie’s Junction (State Park boundary) to near Wellman’s Cienega, although with reasonable tracks to follow (bear left uphill just after the State Park boundary, NOT right and downhill). Largely clear thereafter to Wellman’s Divide. Widespread but patchy snow from Wellman’s Divide (9700’) to San Jacinto Peak. Beyond Wellman’s Divide, traction aids (e.g., microspikes) can be useful but are no longer required for those comfortable hiking on snow.

The Deer Springs Trail above the Fuller Ridge Trail is largely clear to Little Round Valley, but where there is patchy snow it is easily traversed and with good tracks to follow.  In Little Round Valley there is about 80% snow cover (up to 3’ deep) but all signposts are now exposed and there is a good track to follow. The slope from San Jacinto Peak to Little Round Valley has only 25% snow cover, and most of the trail is now exposed and visible. However, large drifts remain in some areas on this heavily switchbacking route, and navigation can be difficult for those unfamiliar with this trail. At San Jacinto Peak itself, there is 75% snow cover above 10,600’, but with many well dug tracks to follow.

Deer Springs Trail: clear to Strawberry Junction. (See above for remaining trail on PCT route, and for its continuation through Little Round Valley.)

PCT south from Saddle Junction to closure: Largely clear, small snow patches near Chinquapin Flat.

South Ridge Trail: Clear to Tahquitz Peak, then passable with care to PCT (Chinquapin Flat). There are some small but steep patches of snow to cross between Tahquitz Peak and Chinquapin Flat, and those who are uncomfortable hiking on snow will find microspikes and hiking poles useful.

Devils Slide Trail: Clear.

Marion Mountain Trail:  Clear.

 

28 April 2017

Overview: Extremely rapid melting in recent days. Some areas >10,000’ lost 12-20” snow in just three days! Due to mild overnight temperatures, snow is now relatively soft in the morning making hiking easier all day. Traction aids (e.g., microspikes) are no longer needed in most areas, although those who are unfamiliar hiking on snow will find them useful.

Water: Continues to be widespread >7500’, ephemeral streams at lower elevations are now mostly dry.

Pacific Crest Trail: PCT is almost completely clear of snow from Saddle Junction to the junction with the Marion Mountain Trail. There is some easily traversed snow – with a good footprint track to follow – for about half-a-mile from 1.5 miles north of Saddle Junction until Annie’s Junction (the State Park boundary), and then again from just south of the Marion Mountain Trail junction to the Fuller Ridge Trail junction.

Fuller Ridge Trail is now passable with care (microspikes no longer required). The majority of the trail is clear of snow. Where there are occasional drifts they have obvious tracks to follow with well-dug steps. There is steep snow at the crossing of the North fork of the San Jacinto River (0.48 miles from south end of Fuller Ridge Trail. There is widespread snow between 3.0-3.8 miles along Fuller Ridge, but the trail is easy to follow, the snow is excellent for walking on, and microspikes should not be needed by most hikers.

There is excellent water at 0.48 and 0.68 miles north from the S end of the Fuller Ridge Trail.

San Jacinto Peak trails: On the trail north from Saddle Junction, there is patchy snow from crest at 9000’ thru Annie’s Junction to near Wellman’s Cienega, although with reasonable tracks to follow (bear left uphill just after the State Park boundary, NOT right and downhill). Largely clear thereafter to Wellman’s Divide.

Widespread snow from Wellman’s Divide (9700’) to San Jacinto Peak. The primary peak trail is becoming clearer every day. Beyond Wellman’s Divide, traction aids (e.g., microspikes) can be useful but are no longer required for those comfortable hiking on snow.

The Deer Springs Trail above the Fuller Ridge Trail is largely clear to Little Round Valley, but where there is patchy snow it is easily traversed and with good tracks to follow.  In Little Round Valley there is almost continuous snow (up to 3’ deep) and some tracks mainly near the course of the streambed. From there to San Jacinto Peak, only parts of the actual trail are exposed and visible. Currently the only tracks to follow ascend more-or-less directly across the snow (not following the trail route). At San Jacinto Peak itself, there is widespread snow cover with deep drifts, but with good tracks.

Deer Springs Trail: clear to Strawberry Junction. (See above for remaining trail on PCT route, and for its continuation through Little Round Valley.)

PCT south from Saddle Junction to Chinquapin Flat: Largely clear, snow patches near Chinquapin Flat.

Chinquapin Flat to Tahquitz Peak was traversed on 18 and 28 April. Largely cleared in the past 10 days, this trail is now passable with considerable care. There are some patches of hard snow to cross, so traction aids (e.g., microspikes) and hiking poles/ice axe are recommended. At current melting rates it will be readily passable in early May.

South Ridge Trail: Clear to Tahquitz Peak (but not beyond, see above).

Devils Slide Trail: Clear to Saddle Junction.

Marion Mountain Trail:  Clear.

 

27 April 2017

Overview: Extremely rapid melting in recent days. Some areas >10,000’ lost 12-20” snow in just three days! Due to mild overnight temperatures, snow is now relatively soft in the morning making hiking easier all day. Traction aids (e.g., microspikes) are no longer needed in most areas, although those who are unfamiliar hiking on snow will find them useful

Water: Continues to be widespread >7500’.

Pacific Crest Trail: PCT is almost completely clear of snow from Saddle Junction to the junction with the Marion Mountain Trail. There is some easily traversed snow – with a good footprint track to follow – for about half-a-mile from 1.5 miles north of Saddle Junction until Annie’s Junction (the State Park boundary), and then again from just south of the Marion Mountain Trail junction to the Fuller Ridge Trail junction.

Fuller Ridge Trail is now passable with care (microspikes no longer required). The majority of the trail is clear of snow. There are occasional drifts throughout the 5.0 miles of Fuller Ridge, but they have obvious tracks to follow with well-dug steps. There is steep snow at the crossing of the North fork of the San Jacinto River (0.48 miles from south end of Fuller Ridge Trail. There is widespread snow between 3.0-3.8 miles along Fuller Ridge, but the trail is easy to follow, the snow is excellent for walking on, and microspikes should not be needed by most hikers.

There is excellent water at 0.48 and 0.68 miles north from the S end of the Fuller Ridge Trail.

San Jacinto Peak trails: On the trail north from Saddle Junction, there is patchy snow from crest at 9000’ thru Annie’s Junction to near Wellman’s Cienega, although with reasonable tracks to follow (bear left uphill just after the State Park boundary, NOT right and downhill). Largely clear thereafter to Wellman’s Divide.

Widespread snow from Wellman’s Divide (9700’) to San Jacinto Peak. The primary peak trail is becoming clearer every day. Beyond Wellman’s Divide, traction aids (e.g., microspikes) can be useful but are no longer required.

The Deer Springs Trail above the Fuller Ridge Trail is largely clear to Little Round Valley, but where there is patchy snow it is easily traversed and with good tracks to follow.  In Little Round Valley there is almost continuous snow (up to 3’ deep) and some tracks mainly near the course of the streambed. From there to San Jacinto Peak, only parts of the actual trail are exposed and visible. Currently the only tracks to follow ascend more-or-less directly across the snow (not following the trail route). At San Jacinto Peak itself, there is widespread snow cover with deep drifts, but with good tracks.

Deer Springs Trail: clear to Strawberry Junction. (See above for remaining trail on PCT route, and for its continuation through Little Round Valley.)

PCT south from Saddle Junction to Chinquapin Flat: Largely clear, snow patches near Chinquapin Flat.

Chinquapin Flat to Tahquitz Peak was traversed on 18 April. Most of the trail remains under 1-2’ of solid, steep, ice. This route is currently treacherous and impassable without ice axe, crampons, and knowledge of how to use them. At current melting rates, this route should be passable within 2-3 weeks.

An alternative to reach Tahquitz Peak from Chinquapin Flat is to ascend the snow field to the ridge that runs east from Tahquitz Peak, and then follow the ridgeline (which is now snow-free) west to the Fire Lookout. This route requires some Class 2 and Class 3 scrambling.

South Ridge Trail: Clear to Tahquitz Peak (but not beyond, see above).

Devils Slide Trail: Clear to Saddle Junction.

Marion Mountain Trail:  Clear.

 

21 April 2017

Overview: Extensive melting in past 4-6 weeks. Snow remains on many sections of trails above 8600’ that are not exposed to direct sun, although depths vary greatly depending on aspect and past drifting. Due to warmer overnight temperatures, snow is now softer in the morning than previously, making transit easier for most hikers. Traction aids (microspikes are best), combined with support (e.g. hiking poles and/or ice axe) continue to be highly recommended in most areas with extensive snow, although they are not necessarily essential.

Water: Continues to be widespread, although many ephemeral streams are drying up fast.

Pacific Crest Trail: PCT is clear of snow from Saddle Junction to 9000’ crest (just south of the State Park boundary), then there is widespread snow to the State Park boundary at Annie’s Junction (spikes are not essential through this section). Clear from that junction past Strawberry Cienega and Strawberry Junction almost to the junction with the Marion Mountain Trail. Snow is widespread but increasingly patchy (1-3’ feet deep) until Fuller Ridge Trail turning. Many PCT trail posts above 8000’ are starting to emerge from snow drifts, making navigation somewhat easier, plus there is now a good footprint track to follow.

Fuller Ridge Trail is now passable with care (microspikes and poles recommended, but not essential). The sign indicating the turning (if heading northbound) has now completely emerged from the deep snow that had been covering it, making navigation easier. There is a good set of tracks to follow even in areas of deeper snow. At the southern end of Fuller Ridge, the trail is largely snow covered for about 0.4 mile, and is steep and icy around the crossing of the North Fork San Jacinto River. Thereafter clear, until the trail crosses onto the north side of the ridge, where largely snow-covered for about 3 miles until near the Fuller Ridge campground.

Deer Springs Trail: clear to Strawberry Junction. (See above for remaining trail on PCT route, and below for its continuation through Little Round Valley.)

PCT south from Saddle Junction to Chinquapin Flat: Largely clear. Spikes are helpful for the southern 0.25 mile.

Chinquapin Flat to Tahquitz Peak was traversed on 18 April. Almost all the trail remains under 1-2’ of solid, steep, ice. This route is extremely treacherous and impassable without ice axe, crampons, and excellent knowledge of how to use them. This trail will not be clear before May.

An alternative to reach Tahquitz Peak from Chinquapin Flat is to ascend the snow field to the ridge that runs east from Tahquitz Peak, and then follow the ridgeline (which is now snow-free) west to the Fire Lookout. This route requires some Class 2 and Class 3 scrambling.

South Ridge Trail: Clear to Tahquitz Peak (but not beyond, see above).

Devils Slide Trail: Clear to Saddle Junction.

San Jacinto Peak trails: On the trail north from Saddle Junction, there is patchy snow from crest at 9000’ thru Annie’s Junction to near Wellman’s Cienega, although with reasonable tracks to follow. Largely clear from Wellman’s Cienega to Wellman’s Divide. Spikes are advisable but not essential for this section.

Almost continuous snow from Wellman’s Divide to San Jacinto Peak. From 10,000’ onwards, there are many tracks through the snow that will get more confusing over the next couple of weeks as partial melting continues. Most do not closely follow the route of the trail, but ultimately head towards the Peak. Beyond Wellman’s Divide, spikes are highly recommended.

The Deer Springs Trail beyond the Fuller Ridge Trail turning is largely clear for about 0.5 mile, then there is almost continuous snow but with reasonable tracks to follow. The trail is largely clear again just below Little Round Valley. In the valley itself, there is almost continuous snow (1-3’ deep) and poor tracks along the course of the streambed. From there to San Jacinto Peak, very little of the actual trail is exposed and visible, and there are no tracks to follow, as the few hikers to pass have ascended or descended directly across the snow (not following the trail route). At San Jacinto Peak itself, there is virtually continuous snow cover (0-6’ deep), but with good tracks.

Marion Mountain Trail:  Clear virtually to the top. Spikes are helpful (but not essential) for the final 0.25 mile nearest to the Deer Springs Trail (PCT).

 

11 April 2017

Overview: Extensive melting in past 2-3 weeks. Icy snow remains in many areas above 8800’, although depths vary greatly depending on aspect and drifting. Traction aids (e.g. microspikes), combined with support (e.g. hiking poles or ice axe) are still recommended on sections of trails above 8500’ that are not exposed to direct sun.

Water: Continues to be widespread, although some ephemeral streams are already drying up.

Pacific Crest Trail: Snow along parts of trail from Saddle Junction to Fuller Ridge campground. Largely clear from Saddle Junction to 9000’ crest, then continuous snow to State Park boundary at Annie’s Junction. Clear from near that junction past Strawberry Cienega (good water) to Strawberry Junction. Snow patches increasingly frequent north from Strawberry Junction, then snow largely continuous (1-3’ feet deep) until Fuller Ridge Trail turning. Many PCT trail posts above 8000’ remain hidden under snow drifts, making navigation somewhat difficult.

Fuller Ridge Trail is now passable with care (see advice above about spikes and poles/ice axe). The sign indicating the turning has now emerged from the deep snow that had been covering it, making navigation easier. There is a very good set of tracks to follow even in areas of heavy snow. At the higher, southern end of the ridge trail, the trail is mostly snow covered for about 0.5 mile, and especially steep and icy around the crossing of the North Fork San Jacinto River. Thereafter largely clear until the trail crosses onto the north side of the ridge, where largely snow-covered until the Fuller Ridge campground, with a mix of clear patches near the lowest, northern end.

South Ridge Trail: Clear to Tahquitz Peak. The trail from Tahquitz Peak to Chinquapin Flat (the PCT junction) continues to be impassable without ice axe and crampons (and excellent knowledge of how to use them), and even then is extremely treacherous.

Devils Slide Trail: Largely clear (no spikes needed) to Saddle Junction.

San Jacinto Peak trails: Almost continuous snow (1-2’) from crest at 9000’ (about 1.5 miles south of Wellman’s Cienega) to Wellman’s Cienega, although with reasonable tracks to follow. Largely clear from Wellman’s Cienega to Wellman’s Divide. Mostly snow-covered, but with some open patches, from Wellman’s Divide to San Jacinto Peak. Good tracks to follow.

The Deer Springs Trail above the Fuller Ridge turning has good sets of tracks to follow to Little Round Valley and then on to San Jacinto Peak, despite traversing at least 1-3’ of snow in most places. Very little of the actual trail is exposed and visible.

Marion Mountain Trail:  Clear almost to the top. Spikes are helpful (but not essential) for the final 0.25 mile nearest to the Deer Springs Trail (PCT).

 

30 March 2017

Overview: In general 2-3 feet of snow above 8000’, although depths vary greatly depending on aspect and drifting. Many trails above 7500’ that are not predominantly south-facing require some form of traction (e.g. microspikes), best combined with support (e.g. hiking poles or ice axe). Spikes and poles are especially useful in the morning when snow is hard and icy. Although crampons are not strictly essential on any trails, they are helpful on steeper terrain. An ice axe is helpful in many locations.

Water: Everywhere!

Pacific Crest Trail: Snow along almost entire trail from Saddle Junction to Fuller Ridge campground. In many areas snow is 1-3 feet deep, with deeper drifts. Largely clear around Strawberry Cienega and Strawberry Junction. Many clear sections on Angel’s Glide (Saddle Junction north to 9000’ crest). Note that almost all PCT trail posts above 8000’, and some junction signs, are completely hidden under snow drifts, making navigation difficult.

Fuller Ridge Trail (hiked with crampons and ice axe on 29 March) is almost completely under 2-3’ of snow. A few very short sections are now visible at the lower, northern, end at 7700’. There are reasonable tracks to follow at the northern end of the trail (from about Castle Rocks to Black Mountain Road), but these are of no use to hikers approaching from the south. While Fuller Ridge is just about passable with spikes and poles in the afternoon (when the snow is softer), this is extremely risky.

I recommend that PCTers do not attempt Fuller Ridge Trail at this time without ice axe, crampons, and good knowledge of how to use them. This situation is unlikely to change before late April at the earliest. The alternate route is to hike up the Black Mountain Road for 8 miles, where you reach the PCT and descend from here 17 miles to Snow Creek. The Black Mountain Road is completely clear of snow for the 5 miles to its crest, and then there are a few small flat snow patches that are easily crossed until the PCT. Please do not attempt to hike from Idyllwild via the highway to the Black Mountain Road. Highway 243 is a narrow, winding, mountain road with no shoulder, and vehicles moving at highway speeds.

South Ridge Trail: Clear (no spikes needed) to Tahquitz Peak. The trail from Tahquitz Peak to Chinquapin Flat (the PCT junction) is currently impassable without ice axe and crampons, and even then is extremely treacherous.

Devils Slide Trail: Largely clear. Although it is possible to reach Saddle Junction without spikes, some hikers will prefer to use them for the uppermost 0.5-1.0 mile.

San Jacinto Peak trails: From Annie’s Junction (the State Park boundary just south of Wellman’s Cienega) to Wellman’s Divide, there are confusing tracks through the snow which do not closely follow the trail. From Wellman’s Divide to about 10,000’, there are good tracks to follow, but thereafter there are many confusing tracks, few of which follow the approximate route of the trail.

The Deer Springs Trail above the Fuller Ridge turning has several useful sets of tracks to follow to Little Round Valley, despite traversing 1-3’ of snow in most places. There is no clear track from Little Round Valley to San Jacinto Peak.

Marion Mountain Trail:  Largely clear around the trailhead and campground, but almost entire trail is under snow, from a few inches near trailhead (6300’) to 1-2 feet at junction with Deer Springs Trail (8700’). There are good tracks to follow that approximate the route of the entire trail, however.

 

17 March 2017

Overview: In general 2 feet of snow above 8000’, 3 feet above 9000’, and 4 feet above 10,000’, although depths vary greatly depending on aspect and drifting. Almost all trails above 7500’ require some form of traction (e.g. microspikes), best combined with support (e.g. hiking poles or ice axe). Spikes and poles are especially useful in the morning when snow is hard and icy. Although crampons are not strictly essential on any trails, they are helpful on steeper terrain. An ice axe is helpful in many locations

Water: Everywhere – every named and unnamed creek is flowing strongly.

South Ridge Trail: Clear (no spikes needed) to Old Lookout Flat (7800’). Passable without spikes to about 8500’, but spikes highly recommended to Tahquitz Peak. The trail from Tahquitz Peak to Chinquapin Flat (the PCT junction) is extremely treacherous and currently impassable without ice axe and crampons. It is possible to reach the PCT from Tahquitz Peak by hiking (with extreme care) over the snow along the east ridge then dropping to Chinquapin Flat.

Devils Slide Trail: Largely clear (no spikes needed) for 1.5 miles to about 7600’. Spikes recommended from there to Saddle Junction.

Pacific Crest Trail: Snow along almost entire trail from Saddle Junction to Fuller Ridge campground. In most areas snow is 2-3 feet deep, with deeper drifts. Largely clear around Strawberry Cienega and Strawberry Junction, although still many drifts in trail. Note that almost all PCT trail posts above 8000’, and many junction signs, are completely hidden under snow drifts, making navigation difficult. Fuller Ridge Trail is completely under 2-4’ of snow and was not traversed until 17 March (and even then only by following the ridgeline, not the trail proper).

San Jacinto Peak trails: From Annie’s Junction (the State Park boundary just south of Wellman’s Cienega) to Wellman’s Divide, there are several confusing tracks through the snow, none of which closely follow the trail. From Wellman’s Divide to about 10,000’, there are good tracks to follow, but thereafter there are many confusing tracks, none of which follow the approximate route of the trail.

The Deer Springs Trail above the Fuller Ridge turning has several useful sets of tracks to follow to Little Round Valley, despite traversing at least 3-4’ of snow in most places. There is no set of tracks to follow from Little Round Valley to San Jacinto Peak.

Ernie Maxwell Trail: clear.